Tuesday, December 1, 2015

On the Run

  


     Jason backed into one of the boxes hard, receiving a good poke in the kidneys. He stood involuntarily erect with pain, and stifled a cry of protest and curses.
     “Jason, I’m scared,” Cora whimpered. “I want to get out of here.” She saw Jason respond with an increasing nervousness. He looked like he would rather be doing anything else.
     “I’m still working on it. It’s not going as quickly as you would like.” Cora heard the man in the lab coat protest.
     “Mr. Evans wants something done now. If you don’t produce, he gets upset. When he gets upset, I get angry. I like being angry, but you won’t like it at all.”
     Cora’s jaw dropped open as the men continued to argue. She looked to Jason for clarification, but his wide-eyed stare  showed nothing but horror.
     They backed away from the doors, but the men’s loud shouting continued. Cora reached for Jason’s hand. At that same moment, Lab Coat backed hard into the doors. He turned away from his tormentor, left cheek pressed against the Plexiglas.
     “Wait,” they heard Lab Coat beg as he motioned and repositioned himself to better look through the window. They saw him bring both hands over his eyes to reduce the glare of light reflecting off the glass. “I think I just saw something in there.”
     Jason and Cora remained still and quiet.
     “Let’s get out of here,” Jason begged. “It’s really time to go.”
     Cora’s senses screamed for them to move, to do something, anything. Her heart pounded at the sight of the face leering through the window, lingering and searching. White skin, neatly cropped black hair, on a square and glasses- framed face was one she may have seen before. Though Lab Coat looked a little familiar, she definitely recognized Business Suit.
     “Get out of the way,” they heard the other bark as he plowed through the doors. The right door banged loudly off one of the boxes in the storage area, then swung lazily back to the closed position on hissing gas hinges. Mr. Suit stood still, waiting for his eyes to adjust to the dark as he breathed loudly with excitement.
     “Run!” Jason screamed.
     Cora followed swiftly, her hand in his. She let him lead her toward the light shining from the other side of an exit door.          They ran with the illusion of the distance growing instead of closing.


Want more? See our book Devoted
http://www.amazon.com/Devoted-Jeffrey-W-Benne…/…/B015HTZW1K/



Monday, October 12, 2015

We're Flying!

    The roar of the engine frightened the natives, causing them to take cover on the ground. The propeller sent wet leaves and vines like miniature missiles flying in their direction, forcing them to stay prone until the plane pulled away.
     As he taxied down the strip, John cranked the flap setting to full in preparation for a short field take-off. As the wing’s trailing edges lengthened, he turned to check on Steve. His buddy was still restless, and not of much use. John set the brakes, running the engine to maximum power. The brakes groaned and the wheels longed to be free. John saw a blur pass before him as he realized the arrow assault had resumed. Something else caught his attention, and he saw how a character ran full speed toward the plane, a stone axe raised in attack.
     John released the brakes and plowed full power toward the end of the runway, but not before the foe released his ax. Striking Steve’s window, it splintered the glass like a complex spider web.
     John held the yoke back as far as possible to keep the nose wheel up. So far he had eaten a lot of ground and still hadn’t gotten off the strip as the long wet grass slowed them. He pulled the throttle to idle and crawled to a stop. At the end of the runway, he increased power to turn around before setting the brakes again. “I’ve got to make it this time,” he groaned, clenching the yoke with his left hand. With his right, he pushed the throttle.
     John released the brakes and began rolling. It wouldn’t be too hard to pick up speed as he headed down hill. He looked down the runway to see four people running in defiance toward him. As the plane lifted, he was encouraged as the sound of grass scraping the wheels was replaced with silence.
     “We’re flying!” John shrieked.
     As he neared the end of the runway, still only five feet above field, he tried to pull the yoke back. Nothing, it wouldn’t budge. He glanced right and noticed the unconscious Steve slumped across the controls.
      “Oh no, you don’t,” John said. He pulled Steve upright.

     Steve came to and yelped as the plane headed straight for the natives. He closed his eyes, anticipating the deadly propellers slashing them. Instead, the equally horrified people ducked to the ground as John pulled up and to the right. The plane responded with a slow roll as it climbed higher into the late morning sky.

Jeffrey W. Bennett, is the author of Commitment-A Novel and other non-fiction books, novels and periodicals.




Influence, Army Leadership

7-14. Apprising happens when the leader explains why a request will benefit a follower, such as giving
them greater satisfaction in their work or performing a task a certain way that will save half the time. In contrast to the exchange technique, the benefits are out of the control of the leader. A commander may use the apprising technique to inform a newly assigned noncommissioned officer that serving in an operational staff position, prior to serving as a platoon sergeant, could provide him with invaluable experience. The commander points out that the additional knowledge may help the NCO achieve higher performance than his peers and possibly lead to an accelerated promotion to first sergeant.

7-15. Inspiration occurs when the leader fires up enthusiasm for a request by arousing strong emotions to build conviction. A leader may stress to a fellow officer that without help, the safety of the team may be at risk. By appropriately stressing the results of stronger commitment, a unit leader can inspire followers to surpass minimal standards and reach elite performance status.

7-16. Participation occurs when the leader asks a follower to take part in planning how to address a problem or meet an objective. Active participation leads to an increased sense of worth and recognition. It provides value to the effort and builds commitment to execute the commitment. Invitation to get involved is critical when senior leaders try to institutionalize a vision for long-term change. By involving key leaders of all levels during the planning phases, senior leaders ensure that their followers take stock in the vision.
These subordinates will later be able to pursue critical intermediate and long-term objectives, even after senior leaders have moved on. 

7-17. Relationship building is a technique in which leaders build positive rapport and a relationship of mutual trust, making followers more willing to support requests. Examples include, showing personal interest in a follower’s well-being, offering praise, and understanding a follower’s perspective. This technique is best used over time. It is unrealistic to expect it can be applied hastily when it has not been
previously used. With time, this approach can be a consistently effective way to gain commitment from
followers.

Get ready for Army Basic Training or Leadership schools with US Army Leadership:





Jeffrey W. Bennett, ISP is the owner of Red Bike Publishing. Jeff is an accomplished writer of non-fiction books, novels and periodicals. He also owns Red bike Publishing. Published books include: "Get Rich in a Niche-Insider's Guide to Self Publishing in a Specialized Industry" and "Commitment-A Novel". Jeff is an expert in security and has written many security books including: "Insider's Guide to Security Clearances" and "DoD Security Clearances and Contracts Guidebook". See Red Bike Publishing for print copies of: Army Leadership The Ranger Handbook The Army Physical Readiness Manual Drill and Ceremonies The ITAR The NISPOM

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Arrows and Hatchets An Excerpt From Commitment-A Novel

     “Hmm?” Steve answered groggily. He wore a stupid smile.
It’s not over. I need you to take the controls so I can prop the plane. Those guys drained the battery.”
     “Ok, fly to get more batteries,” Steve said in his delirium.
     “No! no! no!” John yelled. “I have to hand prop the plane. Listen; just hold your feet on the brakes.”
     John climbed out and turned the propeller a couple of times and prepared for a starting kick. Then he saw a commotion in the jungle. Some of the natives were holding up the ponchos where he and Steve had been. So far they hadn’t seen him.
     “Please, God, let this start,” John prayed before throwing the propeller downward.
     It went around sputtering but not catching. The alerted natives looked and moved slowly toward the plane, taking cover as they advanced.
     “Great, an audience.”

     A hastily fired arrow struck the back window and deflected high above John’s head. He jumped up and shoved the propeller with all his might as he came down. John ran a wide arc around the spinning propeller and entered under the left wing.


Jeffrey W. Bennett, is the author of Commitment-A Novel and other non-fiction books, novels and periodicals. 

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

Army Leadership

7-14. Apprising happens when the leader explains why a request will benefit a follower, such as giving
them greater satisfaction in their work or performing a task a certain way that will save half the time. In contrast to the exchange technique, the benefits are out of the control of the leader. A commander may use the apprising technique to inform a newly assigned noncommissioned officer that serving in an operational staff position, prior to serving as a platoon sergeant, could provide him with invaluable experience. The commander points out that the additional knowledge may help the NCO achieve higher performance than his peers and possibly lead to an accelerated promotion to first sergeant.

7-15. Inspiration occurs when the leader fires up enthusiasm for a request by arousing strong emotions to build conviction. A leader may stress to a fellow officer that without help, the safety of the team may be at risk. By appropriately stressing the results of stronger commitment, a unit leader can inspire followers to surpass minimal standards and reach elite performance status.

7-16. Participation occurs when the leader asks a follower to take part in planning how to address a problem or meet an objective. Active participation leads to an increased sense of worth and recognition. It provides value to the effort and builds commitment to execute the commitment. Invitation to get involved is critical when senior leaders try to institutionalize a vision for long-term change. By involving key leaders of all levels during the planning phases, senior leaders ensure that their followers take stock in the vision.
These subordinates will later be able to pursue critical intermediate and long-term objectives, even after senior leaders have moved on. 

7-17. Relationship building is a technique in which leaders build positive rapport and a relationship of mutual trust, making followers more willing to support requests. Examples include, showing personal interest in a follower’s well-being, offering praise, and understanding a follower’s perspective. This technique is best used over time. It is unrealistic to expect it can be applied hastily when it has not been
previously used. With time, this approach can be a consistently effective way to gain commitment from
followers.

Get ready for Army Basic Training or Leadership schools with US Army Leadership:




Jeffrey W. Bennett, ISP is the owner of Red Bike Publishing. Jeff is an accomplished writer of non-fiction books, novels and periodicals. He also owns Red bike Publishing. Published books include: "Get Rich in a Niche-Insider's Guide to Self Publishing in a Specialized Industry" and "Commitment-A Novel". Jeff is an expert in security and has written many security books including: "Insider's Guide to Security Clearances" and "DoD Security Clearances and Contracts Guidebook". See Red Bike Publishing for print copies of: Army Leadership The Ranger Handbook The Army Physical Readiness Manual Drill and Ceremonies The ITAR The NISPOM

It's Time To Go; An Excerpt From Commitment-A Novel

     Time passed slowly that morning. The natives searched for hours before finally leaving, or at least that’s what John hoped they’d done. The sun was higher in the sky and began burning off the rain water that fell the previous day. Once again fog and steam started to form, leaving John hoping for a gentle breeze to disperse it.
     His plan was simple. He would help Steve the seventy-five or so yards to the awaiting plane and take off straight down the runway. The airstrip sloped upward about five degrees, so he would need all the power the plane had. He nudged Steve, who less than alert.
     “It’s time to go.”
     “Huh? What’s going on?” Steve lifted his pale face, his glazed eyes trying to focus.
     “I need you to be alert. There are very dangerous people after us. We need to get to the plane. Do you understand?”          John spoke slowly, hoping the words would break through Steve’s clouded mind.
     “Just help me up and I’ll race you there.” Steve sobered suddenly, as he clumsily labored to his knees.
     John helped him and sighed in disbelief as his disoriented companion stumbled in the opposite direction. “I think you’ve been disqualified from this heat. Here, let me lead you.”
     Both scurried to the plane. It was like a nightmare as John imagined the plane getting farther away. Finally reaching it, John shoved Steve into the passenger seat.
     Running around the plane, checking for damage and remaining debris, he made a hasty pre-flight check. Satisfied, he reached to turn the power switch on-nothing.
     “Oh no, what next!” John punched the instrument panel.

     He immediately cut it off and back on. He heard the faint sound of the gyro and turned the key. Not enough power remained to start the motor. “Steve, Steve,” John yelled shaking his buddy.

Jeffrey W. Bennett, is the author of Commitment-A Novel and other non-fiction books, novels and periodicals.

Jeff is an accomplished writer of non-fiction books, novels and periodicals. He also owns Red bike Publishing. Published books include: "Get Rich in a Niche-Insider's Guide to Self Publishing in a Specialized Industry" and "Commitment-A Novel". Jeff is an expert in security and has written many security books including: "Insider's Guide to Security Clearances" and "DoD Security Clearances and Contracts Guidebook". See Red Bike Publishing for print copies of: Army Leadership The Ranger Handbook The Army Physical Readiness Manual Drill and Ceremonies The ITAR The NISPOM

Monday, August 31, 2015

Leadership Influence, US Army Style


The following is an excerpt from US Army Leadership. This is an example of how an independent publisher can publish and market books in the public domain.


7-14. Apprising happens when the leader explains why a request will benefit a follower, such as giving them greater satisfaction in their work or performing a task a certain way that will save half the time. In contrast to the exchange technique, the benefits are out of the control of the leader. A commander may use the apprising technique to inform a newly assigned noncommissioned officer that serving in an operational staff position, prior to serving as a platoon sergeant, could provide him with invaluable experience. The
commander points out that the additional knowledge may help the NCO achieve higher performance than
his peers and possibly lead to an accelerated promotion to first sergeant.

7-15. Inspiration occurs when the leader fires up enthusiasm for a request by arousing strong emotions to build conviction. A leader may stress to a fellow officer that without help, the safety of the team may be at risk. By appropriately stressing the results of stronger commitment, a unit leader can inspire followers to surpass minimal standards and reach elite performance status.

7-16. Participation occurs when the leader asks a follower to take part in planning how to address a problem or meet an objective. Active participation leads to an increased sense of worth and recognition. It provides value to the effort and builds commitment to execute the commitment. Invitation to get involved is critical when senior leaders try to institutionalize a vision for long-term change. By involving key leaders of all levels during the planning phases, senior leaders ensure that their followers take stock in the vision.
These subordinates will later be able to pursue critical intermediate and long-term objectives, even after
senior leaders have moved on.

7-17. Relationship building is a technique in which leaders build positive rapport and a relationship of mutual trust, making followers more willing to support requests. Examples include, showing personal interest in a follower’s well-being, offering praise, and understanding a follower’s perspective. This technique is best used over time. It is unrealistic to expect it can be applied hastily when it has not been
previously used. With time, this approach can be a consistently effective way to gain commitment from
followers.

Get ready for Army Basic Training or Leadership schools with US Army Leadership:




Jeffrey W. Bennett, ISP is the owner of Red Bike Publishing. Jeff is an accomplished writer of non-fiction books, novels and periodicals. He also owns Red bike Publishing. Published books include: "Get Rich in a Niche-Insider's Guide to Self Publishing in a Specialized Industry" and "Commitment-A Novel". Jeff is an expert in security and has written many security books including: "Insider's Guide to Security Clearances" and "DoD Security Clearances and Contracts Guidebook". See Red Bike Publishing for print copies of: Army Leadership The Ranger Handbook The Army Physical Readiness Manual Drill and Ceremonies The ITAR The NISPOM